Looking Down To Find Up-Time

November 2011, Vol. 66 No. 11

The 500-megahertz antenna that Hanover chose is among the most popular of the frequency options US Radar offers. The full range extends from 100- to 2,000-megahertz. At 100 megahertz, the Seeker SPR works best for detecting sizable objects, such as bedrock and large pipes, at depths of up to 100 feet. On the opposite end, the 2,000-megahertz antenna provides high-resolution details at depths to 18 inches, displaying everything from fine wire to cracks in concrete. The 500-megahertz antenna provides good versatility, with up to 14 feet of detection for pipes, cables and soil disturbances.

Beyond the sewer pipe project, Hanover anticipates its Seeker SPR will be beneficial in other engineering applications, from finding sinkholes to locating storm pipes for clients. It has already been used to locate water lines and water services, and to explore tight spaces to avoid conflicts between existing utilities and proposed new utilities. Hanover also is interested in exploring GPS options with the Seeker, which can be attached to an external GPS device for additional data collection.

“(The GPS option is) one we’re very interested in and one we’d get a good amount of use from,” Epler said. “It can tell us exactly where we’re at, where the scans start and stop. This would be a time-saving feature and just help make the process more precise.”

More than 50,000 lineal feet of data can be collected and stored in the Seeker before being transferred via USB port to a Windows-based operating system that processes and filters the information. Additional software allows for even greater processing capabilities, although the basic acquisition software that comes with the equipment handles many needs.

While “computer data syncing” and “rugged” don’t typically go hand-in-hand, that’s not the case with the Seeker SPR. All of the machine’s cables and connections have been constructed with tough military-specification, waterproof connectors. Two sturdy wheels scientifically balance the equipment for stability, which also minimizes the pushing effort and, in conjunction, operator fatigue. Additionally, an optional rough terrain attachment with two additional tires makes the machine ready to traverse almost any surface condition.

In the end, the Seeker provides an accurate, real-time picture of what lies beneath — whether it be wires, bedrock or large pipes — all without disturbing the surface or consuming valuable time as with more tedious methods. Plus, it does so silently by operating off of a battery that provides four to six hours of continuous run time.

Buyer's Guide