New Products Introduced At UCT 2014

UCT Review
March 2014, Vol. 69 No. 3
American Augers' Exit-Side Wrench

If you work in the underground construction market and are looking for the newest and best technologies to help you be more productive on the job, then look no further.

The 2014 Underground Construction Technology International Conference & Exhibition (UCT) held Jan. 28-30 in Houston, TX, proved to be the premier exhibit for these innovative products.

With standing-room-only audiences in the new technology education sessions and cutting-edge products on display in the UCT exhibit hall, attendees had the opportunity to learn about the best products and technologies the industry has to offer.

American Augers
The new, multi-functional, job-easing Mid-size Exit-Side Wrench ESW-M is one of the latest HDD accessories from American Augers.

The patent-pending Exit-Side Wrench is ideal for long installations requiring multiple reaming passes to enlarge the pilot hole. It offers up to 60,000 foot/pounds of break-out torque, up to 45,000 foot/pounds of make-up torque, 2,000 foot/pounds of torque on 60 RPM spinner and remote control.

It is designed for use on a Caterpillar 320 excavator using 80 mm pins with 12 ½ inches between pins. Other connections are available on request.

American Augers drill units compatible with the exit-side wrench are DD-220T up to DD-1100RS models.

Sharewell HDD Services
Sharewell.png
A new method of securing horizontal directional drilling machines to the ground to provide stability during drilling and especially during product pullback has been introduced by Sharewell HDD Services.

Named the Cleat, the patent-pending system is a steel structure with hardened steel spikes or “cleats” protruding from the bottom. Using a steel structure, the horizontal directional drilling (HDD) rig drives up on the structure forcing cleats into the earth.

“Anchoring of HDD rigs from 100,000 pounds of pull and greater has always been a challenge,” explained Dan Sharpe, president of Sharewell HDD Services. “In many cases, you must drive in pilings, pour cement or chain off to large dozers. Then after the job, you have to clean it all up, which is time consuming.” Sharpe goes on to explain that after watching his kids play soccer, he wondered if a cleat-like device could be used to hold an HDD rig. And thus a prototype was developed to see if it would work – and it did!